Three guides for doing business in East Asia

Three guides for doing business in East Asia
 

28 August 2017

Tony Robinson / Programme Leader NZTE

East Asian markets are large, fast growing and dynamic. The region has a combined population of over 740 million and its overall retail turnover is expected to nearly double within five years.

This is creating opportunities for New Zealand export businesses who are committed, well-resourced and ready to partner well. Get it right, and you will reap the rewards – get it wrong, and serious problems can result, absorbing time and energy and stalling business growth. 

NZTE has produced three new guides to help remove some of the mystery around doing business with East Asia.

They are designed for companies in the food and beverage sector exporting to Japan, South Korea, the Philippines, Viet Nam, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia. However, many principles can be applied to other industries and to other international markets.

E-commerce in East Asia

Rising retail turnover is being driven by growing consumer classes who are increasingly seeking out high-quality products. Many of these consumers are now researching and shopping online.

Key information:

  • Key e-commerce trends and developments as of 2017
  • Variations between markets - including market size, e-commerce maturity, logistics and business models
  • Major e-commerce players in F&B industries in each market, and how they operate
  • Common approaches for New Zealand companies entering F&B e-commerce in East Asia, including benefits, drawbacks and things to think about.

View and download.

Navigating food import processes in East Asia

Food import regulations vary across East Asia so there is no one-size-fits-all approach to getting your products into market.

Key information:

  • The process cycle for food imports 
  • Local rules and regulations - including a regional overview and country breakdowns for Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Viet Nam and the Philippines
  • Key contacts by country for further help with import processes, including government agencies and regulatory consultants.

View and download.

Partnering for success in East Asia

For many exporters, success relies on in-market partners doing a good job. This guide shows what a successful partner relationship looks like and how to get there. It is relevant to all sectors and includes useful advice for companies targeting other international markets. 

Key information:

  • Active management of channel partners (including agents, distributors, joint-venture partners and licensors) - how to identify potential channel partners, how to troubleshoot and resolve common problems, and how – and when – to move on from a channel partner relationship if needed 
  • The channel partner lifecycle
  • Developing a transparent relationship
  • Supporting your channel partner
  • Managing performance.

View and download.