Contact our Nelson office

Street address: 
Level 2, 75 Trafalgar Street

Nelson, 7010
New Zealand 

Postal address: 

PO Box 840
Nelson, 7040
New Zealand 

Phone: 0800 555 888

Contact us
  • I want to find funding for my export business
    If you’re working out how to fund your export plans, take a look at our useful Export Essentials guide to funding your export growth. This includes information on debt funding and external (investment) funding - the two key options for export companies wanting to expand. 

    The first step in funding your plans is knowing what they’ll cost – so if you’re starting a new business or considering taking your company into overseas markets, make sure you also check out our Export Essentials guide to the cost of exporting.

    Some government grants are available for businesses in New Zealand, but most involve co-funding, meaning you’ll need to at least match the money that you’re given. 

    For information on government funding for your business, visit Business.govt.nz’s useful page on government grants and what you can get help with. 

    The Export Credit Office can also help you with understanding how to access trade finance when you're delivering on export contracts.

    For information about NZTE’s own funding offerings and how they work, visit our page on funding
  • I want to find out about regulations and tariffs for export
    Regulations and tariffs should be one of the first things you find out before exporting. They often determine whether a market will be easy or hard for you to export to, or whether you should try to do business there at all.

    Understanding regulations in your export destination is a must-do. For an introduction to what you need to think about, see our guide on understanding international compliance requirements. This includes tips on how to research regulations, as well as insights on local regulations, standards, health and safety, and dealing with local bureaucracy.

    It’s a good idea to take a look at the rest of the international compliance process while you’re doing your work on regulations – see more information in our guide to understanding international compliance requirements.

    If you’re planning to export food or food-related products, you should also check out the food exporting page on the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) website. MPI maintains a list of Overseas Market Access Requirements (OMARs) for New Zealand food products in different export markets – search and identify OMARs for your product online

    Tariffs can make your products more expensive and less attractive to overseas buyers, so you need to know the charges your products will attract before you commit to a new market.

    You can get a big head start in finding tariff information by using the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (MFAT) tariff finder or the World Trade Organisation’s tariff download facility. You can search the databases by product name, but they work best when you know the approximate Harmonised System (HS) code for your product. HS codes are used by customs authorities around the world to identify products and apply tariffs. The longer the code is, the more precisely it describes your product. The first six digits of an HS code are usually the same worldwide – after that, there can be up to eight further digits, which often vary from country to country.

    The  (NTAU) can help you to find out the first six digits of your HS codes – call +64 4 473 6099 or email mntau@customs.govt.nz

    To get a longer and more precise HS code for a particular market, look up and contact the local customs authority online, or talk to a customs broker or freight forwarder who has done business in that market.
  • I would like to find out how to start exporting

    If you’re thinking about starting an export business, or taking your current business into overseas markets, you’ll need to build a solid export plan.

    A great place to start is with our export plan template. This will help you to think about:

    • your objectives and goals for your export business
    • what your target market looks like – market size and trends, economic factors, and compliance issues
    • your strategy for entering the market – what you’ll be selling (and any adaptations that might be needed), the market niche you’re targeting, who your customers are and what they want, where you sit against your competitors, and your channel and pricing strategies
    • your sales and marketing plans – including your sales process, marketing and promotional activities, and your marketing budget
    • the extra resources you’ll need – added capacity, people, business systems, and financial resources
    • how to measure your performance, including financial, marketing and business key performance indicators (KPIs).

    Our Export Essentials guides are a great place to start with this. You might find the guides below particularly useful:

    You can see our full suite of resources on our Export Essentials page.

  • I’m looking for help to start a new business in New Zealand

    If you’re new to business, or looking to start a new business, Business.govt.nz provides a great base of information and advice, including key compliance and regulatory information for running a business in New Zealand. 

    Check out their Getting Started section which includes guides to starting a business, how to research your market and competitors, choosing the right structure, creating a business plan, funding your business and much more. You can also contact the Business.govt.nz team via their freephone number - 0800 424 946.

    Business Mentors New Zealand provides a start-up mentoring service for people with a new business idea or looking to start a new business. This gives you six months of mentoring from an experienced businessperson, for a one-off registration fee. You can find out more about the Start-Up Business Mentoring Programme on their website.

    NZTE and Callaghan Innovation also work with economic development agencies around the country, which make up the Regional Business Partner (RBP) network. These agencies provide local support for businesses looking to grow, including the following: 

    • assessing your business and working with you to identify key needs 
    • helping you to write an action plan to help your business develop, grow and innovate 
    • identifying relevant training courses, advisors, information, and other services to help meet your specific needs. 
    • connect you with the local business community, industry networks and clusters
    • provide access to Capability Development vouchers
    • help you navigate the support you can get from Government agencies

    The RBP network is made up of these local Economic Development Agencies and Chambers of Commerce: